The Women’s Prize for Fiction 2013: Who Should Win?

Tomorrow’s the big day when the winner of the 2013 Women’s Prize for Fiction will be decided. According to the prize’s website, ‘The Women’s Prize for Fiction is awarded annually to the woman who, in the opinion of the judges, has written the best, eligible full-length novel in English’. ‘The best’? How do you decide what’s best and what are the six shortlisted titles chances?

 

Bring Up the Bodies is a beautifully written novel. Mantel’s use of imagery is striking and taking the viewpoint of Thomas Cromwell gave a fresh perspective to well-trodden ground.

Best for: imagery

Any flaws? Picky but Mantel herself has said that plotting isn’t her strong point which is why she’s borrowed from history.

 

 

Flight Behaviour is a cracking good story. Not something you might expect to say about a novel whose central theme is climate change. But Kingsolver is deft enough to ensure that her characters are characters and not ciphers, ensuring that we engage with Dellarobia and her hopes and dreams for a better life.

Best for: plot

Any flaws? No literary acrobatics (although some would see that as a good thing!)

Life After Life is Kate Atkinson’s most ambitious novel. Atkinson tells the story of Ursula, destined to die and be reborn on exactly the same day until she (or those responsible for her) work out how she is to survive for longer. Both they and her are unaware of her unusual ‘gift’. The structure allows Atkinson to explore the unpredictable nature of child birth at the start of the 20th Century; both world wars; family, marriage and friendship. The writing is incredibly vivid and has you rooting for Ursula as she unpicks another reoccurring scenario.

Best for: the unusual structure.

Any flaws? Some people dislike the unusual structure as it eliminates the possibility of death being a definite end.

May We Be Forgiven falls into the Great American Novel category. It is the story of Harry Silver and his family, or to be more precise, his brother’s family. When George causes an accident and Harry starts an affair with George’s wife, Jane, events spiral and Harry finds himself with two teenagers to raise while continuing his work as a Nixon scholar and meeting women on the internet.

Best for: pace and its comments on modern society.

Any flaws? In the final fifth of the novel the key theme is laid on thick.

 

N-W is Zadie Smith’s clear-eyed tribute to her home turf. It looks at that age-old English obsession with class and whether hard work really does mean you can escape your roots. Smith plays with structure and viewpoint to varying effect.

Best for: dialogue and themes.

Any flaws? The four sections aren’t equally as successful – opinions on the most and least successful vary.

 

Where’d You Go, Bernadette is the tale of a woman who’s lost sight of who she is. Her teenage daughter tells her story, put together through reports, emails and letters. This is a witty and heartfelt look at what happens when your life falls apart and you attempt to carry on regardless.

Best for: humour.

Any flaws? Depends how snobby you are – this is the most commercial book on the list.

 

 

The Winner?

Who do I think is ‘best’? It’s got to be Kate Atkinson for the combination of vivid writing and an unusual structure which, under less skilful hands, could’ve been far from successful. Fingers crossed.

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7 thoughts on “The Women’s Prize for Fiction 2013: Who Should Win?

  1. Crickey, that seems to have come around quickly! Still only read the one shortlisted book – Aktinson. I think it is better than last year’s winner, but the Mantel juggernaut might be difficult to de-rail. Thanks so much for all your round-ups of the contenders, it seemed a mammoth task but you seem to have managed it effortlessly!

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    • Thanks, Sarah. There’s two of the longlist I still haven’t read that I’m hoping to get to at some point.

      I wasn’t a fan of last year’s winner but that choice means that I could actually see any of the shortlisted books winning! Be interesting to see whether the panel are brave enough to give the prize to someone other than Mantel.

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    • It is a good book, just that last big still niggles me. I’ve got her previous work stacked up ready to read though!

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  2. I was just right there rooting for Atkinson, you know how much I love her. I hadn’t heard much of A.M Jones, neither was I familiar with the book, but your little description sounds as something I would read. Have you read Freedom by Jonathan Franzen? Apparently, both books share themes, so maybe you’ll like it.

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    • Hi Elena,

      Yes, I read Freedom when it was published. Enjoyed it but didn’t think the female protagonist’s diary section was authentic – it sounded too much like Franzen – but I enjoyed if still.

      Naomi x

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  3. Pingback: Edge Hill Prize 2013: shortlist round-up | Follow the Thread

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