Jersey Festival of Words: The Crime Panels

My intention was that I would blog about Jersey Festival of Words while I was there. However, that was derailed partly because I had my own event to prepare for and partly because I was having far too good a time to sit down and write. What I’ve decided to do, as I’m now writing in retrospect, is to group events by theme, rather than do a day-by-day commentary. First up: crime.

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I attended two crime panels on the Saturday of the festival. The second, which I’ll come back to in a moment featured two male writers, JS Law and John Samuel, along with Louise Doughty. The first was at 10am and was a fascinating discussion between Antonia Hodgson, editor-in-chief at Little, Brown and author of a series of three historical crime novels which begin with The Devil in the Marshalsea, and Rachel Abbott, self-published author of six novels (Kill Me Again being her latest) and the fourteenth best-selling author (whether traditional or self-published) of the last five years.

Both writers say they got started by thinking about ideas on their commutes. For Rachel, this was plotting a murder in her head stemming from the question, what situation would be so bad a woman would murder a man? She says most of her books have a dilemma at the heart of them. She likes her readers to think about what they would do in that situation. She researched her latest novel, Kill Me Again, by sending her retired sister out in Manchester with a camera. When she went to the Pomona wasteland, near the canal, she asked the builders working there, ‘Can you tell me, is there anywhere decent to bury a body?’.

Antonia fell in love with the 1700s as it’s a period we don’t read or hear about as much, partly because George II was ‘the dullest king we’ve ever had, a ridiculous man!’. She finds the street level fascinating though. ‘I love a good plot, a good mystery, I love a good twist.’ She did her research mostly in the British Library, although for the third book in the series she also used the West Yorkshire archives. She describes the joy of looking at pamphlets that have been tucked away for years and finding personal notes on them. She hasn’t had anyone tell her that anything in her books is wrong but says she included the note about swearing at the beginning of The Devil in the Marshalsea after her American editor questioned whether people really swore that much at the time the novel is set. She says writing about a historical period reminds us how little human nature has changed.

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Bored in Italy, one snowy February, Rachel began to write for her own pleasure. She had no intention of trying to get her writing published but after mixed reviews from her family, she decided to give it a go. She sent the book to six agents. The first one wanted to take it on but didn’t think it was the sort of book that would sell. Because Rachel was 59 at the time, she decided to put it on Kindle instead.

To begin with, nothing happened. The book was published on the 15th November 2011 and sold 16 copies on Christmas Day, which Rachel thought was exciting at the time. However, her marketing background told her, ‘You need to get noticed’, so she put together a twenty-seven-page plan. She worked fourteen hours a day, seven days a week for three months, gaining two-stone from subsisting on biscuits! It took six weeks to get Only the Innocent to number one in the Kindle chart, at which point it was selling 3500 copies a day.

Antonia says, ‘I do think that talent will out, almost always, but it is a slog’. She thinks the industry needs to be more open about the process and describes sending a book into the world as ‘absolutely terrifying’. Her first novel wasn’t published. She says she knew it wasn’t right but was encouraged by agents who told her she could write. She didn’t self-publish ‘because I know so much about the industry: you have to be a brilliant writer and a fantastic entrepreneur’.

She talks about the idea of the ‘gatekeepers’ of the publishing industry, saying that these people are incredibly committed, enthusiastic, creative people, looking for books that will sell well. Although she does say that there is work to be done in terms of diversity. A range of people will lead to a range of tastes in the books bought.

Rachel says the problems in self-publishing are the lack of editing, the low pricing, sock puppets and buying reviews.

They both talk about having to be tough and taking expert advice. Rachel has an agent (Lizzy Kremer, who is also the agent of Paula Hawkins, author of The Girl on the Train). She talks about ‘When I first took her on…’ and that she did so because Kremer told her of one of her books, ‘I thought it was pretty good but you can do better than that’; because she guides her as to what to do next; because she reads and edits her work, and because she’s sold Rachel’s books into twenty different languages. There’s a great moment when she says about Kremer, ‘She’s the professional, she knows what she’s talking about. My agent’s very hands on. She’s quite fierce’.

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Antonia confesses to rejecting a book, in her capacity as an editor, that went on to become a bestseller, but that the book wasn’t for her. She says there’s room for both traditional and self-publishing. They discuss the things traditional publishers do that a self-published author would need to do themselves, or simply doesn’t have access to. For example, it’s difficult for self-published authors to get their books into book shops as retailers don’t have time to see each author rather than meeting a rep from a publishing house; traditional authors receive an advance from the publisher; self-published authors bear the costs of producing and distributing their book; self-published authors aren’t eligible for many competitions (although this is beginning to change) and aren’t part of promotions, whether Richard and Judy or Buy one get one half price.

Rachel says if you want to self-publish, you need to have your books professional edited, copy edited and proof read. Marketing is your responsibility. ‘Whether you’re a success of a failure, it’s down to the amount of effort you put in.’ She says you need to be bloody minded, determined, consistent, analytical and to persevere in order to raise awareness of your book.

If you’re going for a traditional deal, you need to have an honest conversation about expectations when the deal is signed, says Antonia. ‘You do have to go into it knowing what questions to ask’ with regards to the level of marketing your book will receive. ‘The role of the author is becoming far more central,’ she says, describing them as ‘a partner in the publication’. Writers don’t have to be on social media, but it is seen as a bonus if they are when launching a new writer.

Neither writing wants books to disappear and Antonia thinks that the apocalyptic warnings about the death of print are over and things are stabilising. Rachel says the number of ebooks you have to sell to reach number one in the Kindle chart is slightly lower than it was when she started out.

Interestingly, both writers end by saying the ‘essential’ thing you need as a writer, whether traditionally or self-published, is an agent.

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Cathy Rentzenbrink, JS Law, John Samuel, Louise Doughty

Late-afternoon, I was at the Opera House for ‘The Voice of a Thriller’. A discussion between three crime writers, chaired by Cathy Rentzenbrink. Because of the nature of this blog, I’m only going to cover what Louise Doughty, author of Apple Tree Yard and Black Water contributed to the discussion, but the whole thing was fascinating and I think it’s well worth looking up the other writers and their books if this is your genre.

Louise begins by reading two passages from near the beginning of Black Water. She tells us she loves reading from her books because it’s easier than writing them and she’s a frustrated actress, she wanted to be Glenda Jackson in her teens! She reveals that she wanted to do the audiobook for Apple Tree Yard and then her publisher told her they’d got Juliet Stephenson, so she had to relinquish that one!

The idea for Black Water came when she was at the Bali Writers’ Festival in 2012. She was hideously jetlagged, might have had a cocktail too many at the parties and was staying in a hotel above the Ayung River where the nights were noisy. As the monkeys, geckos and monsoon rain kept her awake, she had the image of a man lying awake, mortally afraid. He believed men with machetes were coming for him. He was afraid of something he’d done and Louise knew what was going to get him really was his own ghosts. She wrote the first 2-3000 words and then got stuck for a year.

She talks about how all her books have been different and that makes life hard for a publisher. It was her sixth novel, Whatever You Love, which was first described as a psychological thriller. She says the writer’s ‘only duty is to write the story that’s in your heart to the best of your ability’, it’s up to the publisher to place it within the market. She though Apple Tree Yard, which brought a new audience to her work via the marketing of the book as a psychological thriller, was ‘a feminist indictment of criminal justice’ but it would be ‘churlish’ to resent the way the book was marketed.

Black Water is more overtly political. Louise describes Harper, the protagonist, as a metaphor for a country: can he find love and redemption after a mass killing? She says she wants the book to form a bridge into an unknown world as well as entertaining the reader.

She felt she was ready to write from a male point-of-view for this book. The previous two had been female, first person, present tense. She kept Black Water in third person even though it’s from Harper’s perspective as she wanted him to be unknowable. She spoke to a lot of men when creating the character but, ‘I do fundamentally believe we are all the same’. She said it was the language that caused her a problem: how would Harper have a thought to himself? She uses the line, ‘to do a bit of shopping’ as an example. She says this implies a leisure activity and probably isn’t the way a man would express this. She changed it to, ‘to pick up one or two things’, although she kept a line about flip-flops being unflattering which a man did pick her up on. She liked the line though so it stayed.

Harper is mixed-race (Indonesian and Dutch) and uses his ‘floating ethnicity’ to his advantage. However, in the Netherlands, at school, he is bullied for being black; in the US he is bullied for being Japanese, and in Indonesia, where he works for a large, powerful organisation, he is considered to be white. Louise says she wanted him to be a comedian: he is constantly asked ‘Are you part something?’ in the novel, and that she wanted a man who is a perpetual outsider as ‘outsiders are observers’. She says writers consider themselves to be outsiders, it’s the one thing they all have in common. She ends on the intriguing note, ‘Harper is my most autobiographical character’.

Kill Me Again – Rachel Abbott

Today marks a first for the blog: this is the first time I’ve reviewed a self-published novel. I’m not against covering self-published books but I often find myself distracted and wishing the writer had at least had a copy-editor look at the manuscript, which means I rarely finish reading them. No such issues with Rachel Abbott’s latest psychological thriller Kill Me Again.

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At the beginning of the novel, we meet Maggie Taylor, defence solicitor. Recently moved to Manchester with her husband, Duncan, and two children, eight-year-old Josh and five-year-old Lily, so she could take a job with a top firm and the chance to become a partner. On the day the book begins, she’s met ‘the worst’ client she’s ever defended, Alf Horton. Midway through the interview he told her, ‘Watch yourself out there, Maggie. Nowhere’s safe.’ She’s scared as she crosses the firm’s car park in the dark but Frank Denman, the psychologist on the case, sees her to her car.

As Maggie drives home, it begins to snow. She rings home and no one picks up. On the second time of calling, Josh answers and reveals that his dad’s left the house partway through making the kids’ tea.

Her voice trembling, she whispered ‘Call Duncan’ into her phone, almost afraid of what he would say. She heard the dialling tone. She heard the staccato tune made by the numbers. And then a long continuous tone.

Duncan’s phone had been disconnected.

When Maggie gets home, she discovers Duncan’s taken a weekend bag and some of his clothes and toiletries are missing. More importantly though…

She ran downstairs and out through the connecting door into the garage. Standing to one side against a breezeblock wall was a dark green metal cupboard, a cupboard that had been padlocked since the day she had met Duncan. Now both doors stood open, the padlock hanging loose. The cupboard was empty.

Duncan had gone.

Running alongside Maggie’s story is that of Detective Chief Inspector Tom Douglas. Tom’s ex, Leo, has failed to turn up for a family christening. Leo’s independent but it seems out of character. When Tom goes to her flat, his instinct tells him she’s missing. The following morning, a body of a woman is found under a bridge by Manchester canal.

Linked with this is a case Tom Douglas worked on as a young inspector twelve years earlier, when two women were murdered and a third murder was attempted. The victims had three lines scored into their thigh. The first was left by the canal.

If that isn’t enough to contend with, Josh tells Maggie about a picture that was sent to Duncan’s phone before he left.

‘When Daddy opened it, I was standing right next to him. There was a picture. I only looked because I thought it was you […] A photo of a lady with red lipstick and long dark hair – spread out like yours sometimes is on the pillow.’

The following day, the police issue a photo of the murder victim…

Kill Me Again is a fast-paced, tightly-plotted, utterly terrifying psychological thriller. It’s completely gripping and I was compelled to keep reading. There were so many twists and turns and interwoven threads, it’s an impressive piece of work, even if there were moments that stretched credibility – like a defence lawyer having a husband with a locked cupboard and no idea what was in it. However, I wouldn’t say I enjoyed the book; my issue with it was the murder and torture of women – mostly young with a hint of elderly due to the Alf Horton case. I can’t read any more stories about misogynists and their expressions of their hatred of women, whether it’s how they speak about them or how they murder them. Apparently, dead women sell books but this woman is no longer buying.

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In August 2015, Amazon confirmed that Rachel is the UK’s bestselling independent author over the last five years. She is also listed at number 14 in the list of bestselling authors – both traditionally and independently published – over the same five-year period.

She will appear at Jersey Literature Festival on Saturday 1st October, 10am, in the Arts Centre, along with Antonia Hodgson. They will discuss crime fiction and routes into being published. Tickets are available here.

Jersey Festival of Words 2016 Preview

Some of you might remember that last year I attended the inaugural Jersey Festival of Words. It was a fantastic few days: great events, lovely people and wonderful weather. You can read about the events I attended on the Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

This year the festival returns bigger and better and I’ll be flying out to Jersey on the 28th of September for what I anticipate will be a glorious long weekend.

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If you fancy a long bookish weekend away at the end of summer, then I highly recommend a visit. The festival programme is here and includes a whole range of events from author interviews to workshops to reading groups to panel discussions.

If you can’t make it, then you’re in the right place as I’ll be covering the festival for the blog again this year. Not only that, throughout September I’ll be focusing on books by writers appearing at the festival including Victoria Hislop, Alison Weir, Caroline Lea, Tania Hershman, Erren Michaels, Antonia Hodgson, Rachel Abbott, Louise Doughty, Kat Banyard, Anne Sebba and Sarah Turner aka The Unmumsy Mum.

Cathy Rentzenbrink, whose memoir The Last Act of Love was one of my books of the year in 2015, is also appearing. She’s well worth seeing live – smart, thoughtful, honest and very funny. She gives great interview.

And, well, if you can only afford to go to one event…? I’ll be interviewing Sarah Turner, The Unmumsy Mum, on the Saturday evening in Jersey Opera House. We’d love to see you there.

In the Media, April 2016, Part One

In the media is a fortnightly round-up of features written by, about or containing female writers that have appeared during the previous fortnight and I think are insightful, interesting and/or thought provoking. Linking to them is not necessarily a sign that I agree with everything that’s said but it’s definitely an indication that they’ve made me think. I’m using the term ‘media’ to include social media, so links to blog posts as well as as traditional media are likely and the categories used are a guide, not definitives.

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There’s been a strong narrative about the abuse of women over the last fortnight. Jessica Knoll wrote a personal and powerful essay about the gang rape which informed the writing of her novel Luckiest Girl Alive. What I Know‘ was published on Lena Dunham’s site Lenny. Daisy Buchanan interviewed Knoll for The Pool. Jia Tolentino looked at the reporting of abuse in ‘Is this the End of the Era of the Important, Inappropriate Literary Man‘ on Jezebel. Helen Walmsley-Johnson wrote ‘The shame of abuse has held me hostage for years‘ on The Pool; Kathryn Joyce wrote ‘Out Here, No One Can Hear You Scream‘ on The Huffington Post; Jade Blair wrote, ‘Women Do What They Need To Do To Survive‘ on Hazlitt, and Louise O’Neill wrote ‘Nothing could prepare me for what happened when I published my book‘ on The Pool and ‘What a privilege it is to think that I might have touched other peoples lives in some small way‘ in The Irish Examiner. (The later is O’Neill’s weekly column which I’ve now added to the regulars section at the bottom of the post.)

The 2015 VIDA count for the number of bylines and reviews for female writers in literary magazines was announced. There’s some good news in some areas but, overall, there’s still a long way to go. Rachel McCarthy James followed this with, ‘Women in Publishing 100 Years Ago: A Historical VIDA Count: Representation and Gender (Im)Balance in 1916‘ on Literary Hub

The longlist for the Desmond Elliott Prize was announced with seven books by female writers in the running.

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The best of the rest:

On or about books/writers/language:

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Personal essays/memoir:

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Feminism:

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Society and Politics:

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Film, Television, Music, Art, Fashion and Sport:

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The interviews:

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The regular columnists: