In the Media: October 2016, Part Two

In the media is a fortnightly round-up of features written by, about or containing female writers that have appeared during the previous fortnight and I think are insightful, interesting and/or thought provoking. Linking to them is not necessarily a sign that I agree with everything that’s said but it’s definitely an indication that they’ve made me think. I’m using the term ‘media’ to include social media, so links to blog posts as well as as traditional media are likely and the categories used are a guide, not definitives.

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A woman didn’t win The Man Booker Prize this year but there was still some interesting coverage of the prize and the shortlisted writers:

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The best of the rest:

On or about books/writers/language:

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Personal essays/memoir:

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Feminism:

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Society and Politics:

Film, Television, Music, Art, Fashion and Sport:

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The interviews/profiles:

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The regular columnists:

In the Media: 3rd August 2014

I’m introducing a new weekly feature to the blog, the premise of which is very simple: it’s a round-up of features written by, about or containing female writers that have appeared during the previous week and I think are insightful, interesting and/or thought-provoking. Linking to them is not necessarily a sign that I agree with everything that’s said but it’s definitely an indication that they’ve made me think. Also, just a note to make it clear that I’m using the term ‘media’ to include social media, so links to blog posts as well as traditional media are likely.

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  • The Bailey’s Women’s Prize for fiction published the results of their #thisbook campaign to find the twenty books by female writers which changed people’s lives (you can read about mine here). The results were:
  1. To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
  2. The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
  3. Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
  4. Harry Potter – J.K Rowling
  5. Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
  6. Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
  7. Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
  8. Little Women – Louisa May Alcott
  9. The Secret History – Donna Tartt
  10. I Capture The Castle – Dodie Smith
  11. The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath
  12. Beloved – Toni Morrison
  13. Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
  14. We Need To Talk About Kevin – Lionel Shriver
  15. The Time Traveller’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
  16. Middlemarch – George Eliot
  17. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings – Maya Angelou
  18. The Golden Notebook – Doris Lessing
  19. The Colour Purple – Alice Walker
  20. The Women’s Room – Marilyn French

Is there anything I’ve missed that you think’s noteworthy? Let me know in the comments.